USING BATTLING ROPES EFFECTIVELY

Using Battling Ropes Effectively

You might have seen them in the gym, two long heavy ropes wrapped around a stationary pillar. They might not be the first thing that springs to mind when it comes to getting lean, but battling ropes are one of the most brutal, dynamic, fat-busting exercises you can possibly do to lose fat and pack on lean muscle.

BATTLING ROPES CAN BE A VERY EFFICIENT WORKOUT TOOL IF USED THE RIGHT WAY

BATTLING ROPES ARE GAINING POPULARITY

Battling ropes work each arm independently, offering a workout that builds strength, while simultaneously developing cardiovascular fitness. This is why battling ropes have long been a feature of boxing and MMA gyms, where martial artists need a dynamic blend of upper body strength and phenomenal fitness capabilities.

The arrival of battle ropes into mainstream gyms should be something to celebrate. They are an effective piece of gym equipment, no matter what your goals are, and if used effectively, can help you sculpt the lean, shredded body you crave.

START BY ADDING BATTLING ROPES INTO THE END OF YOUR WORKOUTS

The best way to start incorporating battling ropes into your workout program is by adding some interval rope training at the end. Start with 30-second intervals.

Get into a squat position, with your feet shoulder-width apart, and a stable core. Then bring your arms up and down in alternating motions. Perform this motion for 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Start with three minutes of 30 seconds working, then followed by 30 seconds rests and gradually increase it to four, then five, then six.

Once you are comfortable with this, add intervals of ropes with both arms in tandem. Bring the ropes up and down together for more intensity.

USING ROPES TO MEET YOUR WORKOUT GOALS

Once you have the technique down, you can use battling ropes to further any workout goal. For more power and explosive movements, use the ropes for 10 seconds at maximum intensity, then rest for around 50 seconds before repeating. You can feasibly complete a whole workout by carrying out 25 sets of 10 seconds on, 50 seconds off. If you are doing it at the end of a workout, I would recommend doing between five and 20 minutes.

For strength endurance applications, 30 seconds of ropes followed by a minute of rest is a good measure. You won’t perform the movement as intensely as you might if you were training for explosive power. Carrying out anywhere between 10 and 30 minutes of activity in this way will provide you with more strength and muscle endurance for your training.

As a good cardio session to increase aerobic capacity, try to do two minutes of ropes followed by a single minute of rest for between 20 to 60 minutes. At this point, you are not looking for explosive movements.

USING ROPES TO ACTIVATE DIFFERENT MUSCLES

Different rope movements will activate different muscles. Tweaking the motion can help you target the desired muscle group.

The wave, where you hold a rope in each arm and move them up and down independently, focuses on biceps, but when you bring your arms together and do the motion in tandem, it incorporates arms, shoulders and back.

Moving each arm in independent circular motions will activate your shoulder muscles. Flyes, where you squat low, bend your elbows slightly and move the ropes as if you are flapping a set of wings, activates your back and is particularly exhausting.

You can also increase or decrease the resistance the ropes offer, depending on where you stand. The closer you stand to the anchor point, the slacker you have and the heavier the ropes become. Similarly, the further away from the anchor point you stand, the lighter they become.

Take your training to another level by adding battling ropes into your program. Whatever your goals, they should be in your workout repertoire to blast fat, build muscle, and get you into a beach-ready mode.  

ANTHONY HILL, FOUNDER

Anthony Hill

When you put together the sum total of my 30 years of bodybuilding training, the contests, the vast array of diets I have experimented (tortured) myself with as well as the experiences I have been through with various training partners in the gyms I have trained in all over the world, it’s been a great ride and I wouldn’t change it for anything. Over the years, I have been fortunate enough to be able to do lots of personal training for private clients alongside my day job. For a few years during my 30’s, I moved to Asia and worked as the Fitness Manager and head personal trainer at one of Thailand’s leading gyms in Bangkok. Learn More

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