KNOWING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BURN AND PAIN

Knowing the Difference Between Burn and Pain

The quote, “no pain, no gain” is almost as old as time itself. You’ve probably heard it from coaches, personal trainers, and your mum telling you to clean out the garage. But the word pain can often be misconstrued and generalized, and downright dangerous.

You see, pain is our body’s way of saying, “hold on, something is wrong here. That it’s time to step back and reassess”. However, this isn’t to say that whenever you feel muscle discomfort during a set you should drop everything and go home. Learn to differentiate between burn and pain below.

BURN AND PAIN ARE NOT SYNONYMOUS! HOW DO YOU TELL THEM APART?

SPOTTING THE DIFFERENCE

Burn and pain are not the same thing. It’s important to know what kind of “pain” is actually benefiting your progress and what kind is telling you that you need to stop. For the most part, the muscular burn you feel when you’re deep into a set of any exercise is the pain you should be aiming to achieve every time you set foot into the gym

Pain around a specific joint or several joints, that doesn’t leave any burning sensation in the muscles is an indication that something is wrong on a functional level. But here’s the kicker, overtraining of your muscles can eventually lead to joint problems. It will also lead to that bad pain you want to avoid.

HOW TO PREVENT BAD PAIN

Staying healthy in a fitness regime is all about preventing injury. There’s no better feeling than heading out of the gym stronger than when you walked in.

Conversely, it’s a really awful feeling going to the gym and then leaving with the feeling that you’re weaker due to limited mobility from joint pain. Make sure that you are consistently warming up before training. Include post-workout stretching of the muscles you had just previously trained.

I strongly recommend post workout stretching rather than pre-workout. If you stretch a stagnant, cold muscle, you can actually decrease its potential strength and cause unwanted microtears.

By stretching post workout, you’re elongating a muscle that has already been stretched out due to an increase of blood volume as a result of working out.

ANTHONY HILL, FOUNDER

Anthony Hill

When you put together the sum total of my 30 years of bodybuilding training, the contests, the vast array of diets I have experimented (tortured) myself with as well as the experiences I have been through with various training partners in the gyms I have trained in all over the world, it’s been a great ride and I wouldn’t change it for anything. Over the years, I have been fortunate enough to be able to do lots of personal training for private clients alongside my day job. For a few years during my 30’s, I moved to Asia and worked as the Fitness Manager and head personal trainer at one of Thailand’s leading gyms in Bangkok. Learn More

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